UNL Research Opportunities

Biomedical Research in Neuronal Cell Death

School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences

Faculty Advisor: Rodrigo Franco

Contact Email: rfrancocruz2@unl.edu

Potential UCARE Research Position?: Yes

Start Date: June or September (depending on application)

Paid or Volunteer: Both choices available

Hours Per Week: 10 hrs per week in Academic year and/or 20 hrs per week in summer (depending on the type of application submitted.

Acceptable Undergraduate Majors: Biochemistry, Genetics, Biological Systems Engineering, Biological Sciences, Psychology, Veterinary or Animal Science

The laboratory of Dr. Rodrigo Franco of the Redox Biology Center at the School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences is looking for a UCARE student with an interest in Biomedical Research. The laboratory uses advanced cell biology, biochemistry and molecular biology approaches to understand the molecular mechanism involved in the etiology of diseases associated with neuronal cell death in the Central Nervous System. We are particularly interested in enthusiastic and committed students, which will learn a variety of experimental approaches during the first year to develop a more independent research project for the second year. The student will be also involved in other projects, bibliography discussion and seminars to develop the proper critical/analytical thinking of a researcher. It is expected that at the end, the student’s research will lead to at least 1-2 published research manuscripts (co-author) in respected journals in the field.

If interested, please contact Dr. Franco at (402)472-8547(402)472-8547, rfrancocruz2@unl.edu.

You can check the website: http://www.unl.edu/RedoxBiologyCenter/faculty.shtml, for more information regarding research projects within the lab.

Mapping Nebraska: Sheldon Statewide

Art & Art History

Faculty Advisor: Elizabeth Ingraham

Contact Email: eingraham2@unl.edu

Potential UCARE Research Position?: Yes

Start Date: June 1 for Summer 2013; September 1 for Fall and Spring Academic Year, 2013-2104

Paid or Volunteer: Paid

Hours Per Week: 20 hrs/week Summer; 10 hrs/week Fall and Spring Semesters

I’m a sculptor and textile artist working on a multi-media project called Mapping Nebraska. Part of my project will travel to a number of communities all over Nebraska in 2013-2014 as part of the Sheldon Museum’s Statewide program. I am producing site-specific textile constructions for each of these Sheldon Statewide venues and conducting community outreach. You would be helping me with this project and working in my studio at 220 Richards Hall, City Campus. The same person could work both periods on a year-long assistantship, June 2013 to April 2014.

You would be sewing by hand and machine and stitching buttonholes and decorative bindings; stenciling designs onto fabric; preparing textile work for exhibition, shipping and archival storage; maintaining an art database and assisting with promotion and outreach; providing input on the design and development of textile art works, and conducting visual and material research.

Visit http://www.mappingnebraska.com to find out more about my project.

Biomedical Device Design

Mechanical & Materials Engineering

Faculty Advisor: Jeff Hawks

Contact Email: jhawks2@unl.edu

Potential UCARE Research Position?: Yes

Start Date: June or September (depending on application)

Paid or Volunteer: Paid

Hours Per Week: 10 hrs per week in Academic year and/or 20 hrs per week in summer (depending on the type of application submitted).

Work on NASA related projects for the Human Exploration Group. Projects include automated chest tube insertion and non-invasive intracranial pressure monitoring. Work includes data collection on lab experiments and prototype design, development and testing. Contact Dr. Hawks for more details if interested.

Food Process Automation

Mechanical & Materials Engineering

Faculty Advisor: Jeff Hawks

Contact Email: jhawks2@unl.edu

Potential UCARE Research Position?: Yes

Start Date: September 2013

Paid or Volunteer: Paid

Hours Per Week: 10 during Academic year

Working on the design and analysis of various food manufacturing processes. Research on the automation of various process. Computational fluid dynamics will be used to analyze prototype design and performance as well as laboratory testing.

Ancient Carbon Isotope Records and Climate Change

Earth & Atmospheric Sciences

Faculty Advisor: Ross Secord

Contact Email: rsecord2@unl.edu

Potential UCARE Research Position?: Yes

Start Date: Mid March - early April

Paid or Volunteer: Paid

Hours Per Week: Up to 20

Prepare samples for stable carbon isotope analysis in labs at UNL. Samples are from ancient soils collected in Wyoming and New Mexico. The goal is to identify intervals of carbon cycle disturbance, which often coincide with climate change. Applicants should be geoscience majors or have a strong interest in geology.

Refugees During the Armenian Genocide 1915-1923

History

Faculty Advisor: Bedross Der Matossian

Contact Email: bdermatossian2@unl.edu

Potential UCARE Research Position?: Yes

Paid or Volunteer: Volunteer

The task of the student will be to scan hundreds of documents from the Aram Andonian archives pertaining to the eyewitness accounts during the Armenian genocide. In addition, the student will transcribe archival documents in English from the Armenian Genocide Archives of the Armenian Patriarchate of Jerusalem that is under my disposal.

Care Transitions for Patients with Chronic Illness

Nursing

Faculty Advisor: Lani Zimmerman, PhD

Contact Email: lzimmerm@unmc.edu

Potential UCARE Research Position?: Yes

Start Date: Summer and/or Fall 2013

Paid or Volunteer: Paid

Hours Per Week: 20 in Summer, 10 in Academic Year

Patients with multiple chronic illnesses discharged from the hospital are frequently re-hospitalized within 1-3 months. Re-hospitalization puts a huge burden on the patients as well as the hospital.

This project will study patients with chronic illnesses and their care transition from hospital to home. This study will primarily focus on self-management skills for patients categorized by cognition and patient activation level. Students chosen will be actively involved in the research process to improve patient outcomes in this population. Duties may include literature synthesis, data collection, data entry, and attending team meetings. The research may lead to manuscript publication as co-author.

We are particularly interested in students considering an advanced degree in nursing. We are interested in individual or a team of students.

Physical Activity Telehealth Intervention in Rural Patients after Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

College of Nursing

Faculty Advisor: Janet Nieveen

Contact Email: jlnievee@unmc.edu

Potential UCARE Research Position?: Yes

Start Date: June 2013

Paid or Volunteer: Paid

Hours Per Week: 20

This is a project that is testing the feasibility of delivering a behavior change intervention in the area of physical activity via a cell phone. Outcome measures include both objective and subjective physical activity measures. Data collection is currently in progress. The student would have experience in all research areas, including literature review, working with EXCEL files, data entry, creative development of presentations etc.

Toddler Sleep Project

Child, Youth and Family Studies

Faculty Advisor: Victoria Molfese

Contact Email: vmolfese2@unl.edu

Potential UCARE Research Position?: Yes

Start Date: June 1

Paid or Volunteer: Volunteer

Hours Per Week: 10

The Toddler Sleep Project studies sleep and self-regulation behaviors in children 2 ½ - 3 ½ years of age. Research teams visit the children's homes and the children and parents come into the lab to engage in several tasks. Students helping in the lab have opportunities to observe children's and parents behaviors, assist with data collection, date reduction and data entry, and to work with the research team on interpretation of study findings, collection of research literature, and manuscript writing.

We are looking for someone who has experience working with children and families, is organized and responsible, interested in being involved in a research study, and who has flexible summer availability (days and evenings).

Fungi and Plant Disease Projects - Lab and/or Field

Plant Pathology

Faculty Advisor: Gerry Adams

Contact Email: gadams3@unl.edu

Potential UCARE Research Position?: Yes

Start Date: Summer or Fall

Paid or Volunteer: Paid

Hours Per Week: Flexible

Several projects are available and can be individually modified for interest and opportunity. Projects Funded by grant line:

1. Looking at the nuclei and how they change in the pathogen that caused the potato famine (methods include DNA isolation, genetic fingerprinting, flow cytometry, culturing on agar media, producing fruiting bodies, staining nuclei).

2. Determining the identification of new and known plant pathogenic fungi by DNA sequencing and computer software programs (methods include DNA extraction, reading DNA sequencing, working with DNA sequence on the web and with software, phylogenetic analysis, molecular genetics).

3. Identifying the water molds in the saline Salt Creek springs (methods-baiting, isolating and culturing fungi on selective media, DNA extraction, DNA sequencing, working with DNA sequence on the web and with software, phylogenetic analysis, molecular genetics).

These projects are designed such that a bright undergraduate student can be involved and included in preparing and submitting an article for publication in a science journal.

Plant Diseases - Fungal Pathogens and Crop Resistance

Plant Pathology

Faculty Advisor: James Steadman

Contact Email: jsteadman1@unl.edu

Potential UCARE Research Position?: Yes

Start Date: Summer or Academic Year

Paid or Volunteer: Paid

Hours Per Week: 20 during Summer, 10 during Academic Year

Research will involve using molecular and classical methods to characterize isolates of fungal pathogens (biotrophs & necrotrophs) to determine diversity in the populations. Using appropriate isolates to screen crop plant lines for resistance to the specific pathogen isolates. Molecular tools will be used to trace the movement of fungal pathogen isolates across states/countries. The lab has state, national and international goals to improve food security. Students, visiting scientists & technologists are from Brazil, Africa, Caribbean and the Americas.

Development of Microfluidic Devices for Cell Mechanics Research

Mechanical and Materials Engineering

Faculty Advisor: Sangjin Ryu

Contact Email: sangjin.ryu@unl.edu

Potential UCARE Research Position?: Yes

Start Date: Summer or Fall

Paid or Volunteer: Paid

Hours Per Week: 10-20 (depending on application type)

The objective of our project is to develop microfluidic devices for cell mechanics research. This research includes fundamental experimental research on droplet-based channel devices and microfluidic device development for fabrication of hydrogel substrates with stiffness gradient.

We seek undergraduate student researchers with background in mechanical engineering, physics, chemical engineering or any relevant fields to help with all aspects of research. Responsibilities of the researchers will have components on microfluidic device fabrications and experiments. Interested students are encouraged to contact Dr. Ryu to discuss further details of the projects.

Assessing the Impact of 4-H Youth Development on Post-Secondary Decisions

4-H Youth Development

Faculty Advisor: Jill Walahoski

Contact Email: jwalahoski2@unl.edu

Potential UCARE Research Position?: Yes

Start Date: Summer or Fall

Paid or Volunteer: Paid

This project will explore the connection between participation in 4-H and recruitment to post-secondary education. A student will provide leadership to the development, facilitation and analysis of mixed methods assessment that will include a study of former 4-H participants at varying points in their post-secondary education experience, including measuring the impact of 4-H on their initial selection and the retained influence of their 4-H experience as they enter the work force.

Decolonization: The Decline and Fall of Empires since WWII

History

Faculty Advisor: James Le Sueur

Contact Email: jlesueur@unl.edu

Potential UCARE Research Position?: Yes

Start Date: Summer or Fall 2014

Paid or Volunteer: Paid

Hours Per Week: 15

Student will conduct research in Congressional Record and British Parliamentary debates, plus research in library and/or Eisenhower and Truman Library.

Exploring Below-Ground Biodiversity

Plant Pathology

Faculty Advisor: Dr. Thomas O. Powers

Contact Email: tpowers1@unl.edu

Start Date: Summer or Fall 2013

Paid or Volunteer: Paid

Hours Per Week: 10 hours/week during school year; 20 hours/week during summer

This research project explores the identity and diversity of soil organisms in native and agricultural plant communities across North America. We use light and scanning electron microscopy combined with DNA barcoding to characterize plant- parasitic nematodes. All research data associated with nematode species are added to a customized database, geographically mapped, and incorporated into our Plant and Insect Parasitic Nematode web site.

Student researchers will be involved all phases of the research, from field collection to DNA analysis. Applicants with GIS experience preferred.

Mechatronics & Robotics

Mechanical & Materials Engineering

Faculty Advisor: Jeff Hawks

Contact Email: jhawks2@unl.edu

Potential UCARE Research Position?: Yes

Start Date: ASAP

Paid or Volunteer: Paid

The Mechanical & Materials Engineering department is seeking a mechanical engineering student to work on various mechatronics and robotics projects.

Mass culture of Vorticella convallaria and control of its habitation

Mechanical & Materials Engineering

Faculty Advisor: Sangjin Ryu

Contact Email: sangjin.ryu@unl.edu

Potential UCARE Research Position?: Yes

Start Date: Summer or Fall (depending on application)

Paid or Volunteer: Paid

Hours per week: 10-20 hours/week (depending on application)

The objective of the project is to improve the current mass culture method of Vorticella convallaria and to develop methods to control habitation of Vorticella convallaria. Vorticella convallaria is a stalked protozoan of which the stalk shows ultra-fast contractions. During the stalk contraction, the stalk of Vorticella develops contractile force up to a few hundreds nN and seems to enhance mixing around the habitat, so we investigate this single cell animal as a model system for biomimetic actuators and microfluidic mixers. For these purposes, we need to harvest significant volume of Vorticella and to control its attachment to solid surfaces.

We seek undergraduate student researchers with background in any relevant fields to help with all aspects of research. Because Vorticella cell culture is very easy, biological background is not required. Interested students are encouraged to contact Dr. Ryu to discuss further details of the projects.

Development of two-dimensional microfluidic channel device using controlled surface wettability

Mechanical & Materials Engineering

Faculty Advisor: Sangjin Ryu

Contact Email: sangjin.ryu@unl.edu

Potential UCARE Research Position?: Yes

Start Date: Summer or Fall (depending on application)

Paid or Volunteer: Paid

Hours per week: 10-20 hours/week (depending on application)

The objective of our project is to develop two-dimensional microfluidic devices, which does not have any walls, for controlled drop motion and mixing. We aim to fabricate such two-dimensional fluidic devices using controlled surface wettability, i.e., superhydrophilic patterns surrounded by superhydrophobic areas, and to investigate dynamics of drops rolling on the device. Because such devices operate powered by gravity, we expect to remove pressurizing components (pumps) and to achieve instantaneous mixing and reactions among aqueous agents.

We seek undergraduate student researchers with background in mechanical engineering, physics, chemical engineering or any relevant fields to help with all aspects of research. Responsibilities of undergraduate researchers will include fabrication of two-dimensional microfluidic devices and fluid dynamics experiments to test the devices. Interested students are encouraged to contact Dr. Ryu to discuss further details of the projects.

Dynamics of Signal Transduction Networks in Disease

Biochemistry

Faculty Advisor: Tomas Helikar

Contact Email: thelikar2@unl.edu

Potential UCARE Research Position?: Yes

Start Date: ASAP

Paid or Volunteer: Either

Hours per week: 10-20 hours/week

The Helikar laboratory in the Biochemistry department is looking for students to study the dynamics of large-scale computational models of biochemical signal transduction networks in immune cells under healthy and diseased conditions. Our laboratory is highly interdisciplinary, and we are looking students with any mix of bio, computer science, and/or math background and interests. The student will participate in multiple projects, and is expected to conclude their project with a co-authored publication.

Water Reuse and Food Safety

Civil Engineering

Faculty Advisor: Xu Li

Contact Email: xuli@unl.edu

Potential UCARE Research Position?: Yes

Start Date: Flexible

Paid or Volunteer: Paid

Hours per week: 10-20 hours/week (depending on application)
Treated wastewater is being increasingly used to supplement fresh water for crop irrigation. Due to limitations in wastewater treatment, treated wastewater often contains pathogens. Pathogens may contaminate plant surface and soil through irrigation, and then later get internalized into the plants.

Internalized pathogens cannot be eliminated through washing, and therefore pose a food safety concern of consuming vegetables that are eaten raw. The objective of the project is to understand and minimize the accumulation of pathogens in vegetables irrigated with treated wastewater.

The undergraduate researcher will work closely with a Ph.D. student to analyze soil and plant samples for a model pathogen Salmonella. The project will provide the undergraduate research an opportunity to gain hands-on experience on characterizing the microbial properties of soil and plant samples.

Microbial Degradation of Contaminants in Water

Civil Engineering

Faculty Advisor: Xu Li

Contact Email: xuli@unl.edu

Potential UCARE Research Position?: Yes

Start Date: Flexible

Paid or Volunteer: Paid

Hours per week: 10-20 hours/week (depending on application)

Microbes can degrade contaminants in water, including contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) such as steroid hormones and antibiotics. This research project will focus on investigating the mechanisms that microbes use to degrade these contaminants.

The undergraduate researcher will work with a Ph.D. student to operate batch reactors and monitor the degradation of contaminants. Different reactor operating conditions will be tested to evaluate their impacts on contaminant degradation. The project will provide the undergraduate researcher an opportunity to gain hands-on experience on operating batch reactors and on learning techniques to measure the chemical and microbial properties of water samples.

Improving Soil Properties to Establish Roadside Vegetation

Civil Engineering

Faculty Advisor: Xu Li

Contact Email: xuli@unl.edu

Potential UCARE Research Position?: Yes

Start Date: Flexible

Paid or Volunteer: Paid

Hours per week: 10-20 hours/week (depending on application)

Roadside vegetation performs ecosystem functions and benefits people and their environment in many ways. However, several Nebraska highways have segments where vegetation cover failed to establish despite repeated seeding efforts. The goal of this study is to identify cost-effective solutions that can assure adequate soil conditions for establishment of selected seeding mixtures.

The undergraduate researcher will help determine soil properties critical to rapidly establishing roadside vegetation, assist in testing seed mixtures for vegetation establishment, and conduct literature search to identify remedial methods for vegetation establishment in suboptimal soil. The project will provide the undergraduate researcher an opportunity to work on an interdisciplinary project that involves civil engineering, soil science, and plant science.

Measuring the Yielding or Fatigue Strength of Rubber by Thermography

Mechanical & Materials Engineering

Faculty Advisor: Linxia Gu

Contact Email: lgu@unl.edu

Potential UCARE Research Position?: Yes

Start Date: Summer or Fall 2014

Paid or Volunteer: Paid

Hours per week: 10 or 20 hours/week

Infrared thermography is a process to obtain images by using an infrared camera to detect the radiation from an object at an absolute temperature of not less than 0 degree. This study uses an infrared thermal camera to monitor the temperature increases from the test specimens and accordingly to estimate the stresses and fatigue limits.

Computational Biology & Software Technology Development

Biochemistry

Faculty Advisor: Tomas Helikar

Contact Email: thelikar2@unl.edu

Potential UCARE Research Position?: Yes

Start Date: Immediately

Paid or Volunteer: Either

Hours per week: 10-20 hours/week

The Helikar laboratory in the Biochemistry department is looking for students to use help develop new computational modeling software tools. We are looking for someone with Java and Javascript programming experience to develop easy to use data visualization components for large-scale biological networks. Our laboratory is highly interdisciplinary, and we are looking students with any mix of computer science, bio, and/or math background and interests. The student will participate in multiple projects.

For more information about our work, please visit www.helikarlab.org.

Archaeological Pollen Analysis

Anthropology

Faculty Advisor: Carrie Heitman

Additional Faculty: Karl Reinhard

Contact Email: cheitman2@unl.edu

Potential UCARE Research Position?: Yes

Start Date: May 15, 2014

Paid or Volunteer: Volunteer

Hours per week: 5-10 hours/week

This research project involves plant pollen analysis. The student will need to learn microscopy and count 200 pollen grains in samples extracted from prehistoric fecal samples.

An ideal candidate will have previously taken NRES 446/846. Drs. Heitman and Reinhard will work with the UCARE student on developing a research project. Upon completion of the analysis, the student will have the opportunity to co-author on resulting publications.

Anthology of Midi Accompaniments to the Trombone Solo Repertoire

Glenn Korff School of Music

Faculty Advisor: Scott Anderson

Contact Email: scott.anderson@unl.edu

Potential UCARE Research Position?: Yes

Start Date: May 13, 2014

Paid or Volunteer: Paid

Paid Rate: $12/hr

Hours per week: 12 hours/week

The student would assist in the further development of my midi anthology of trombone solo accompaniments. This anthology has been an ongoing project for the past 15 years. I have a great deal of new repertoire that I would like to add to the anthology.

The skill set the student would need includes proficiency using Finale Music Notation software on the Mac platform. In addition, the student is required to have a background in music in order to read clefs, dynamics, articulations and tempi.

Developing a controlled delivery system for alpha-tocopherol

Department of Food Science & Technology

Faculty Advisor: Wajira Ratnayake

Contact Email: wajira@unl.edu

Potential UCARE Research Position?: Yes

Start Date: May 2014

Paid or Volunteer: Paid

Hours per week: 15-20 hours/week

The project will involve studies on developing a controlled delivery system using starch-based matrix material for alpha-tocopherol acetate. The microparticle system will be prepared by spray-drying, and evaluated for properties and tocopherol release profiles under selected in-vitro environments. This study will be a part of on-going research projects and the student will have an opportunity to co-author research publications upon successful completion of the work.

Social and Mobile Media Research

College of Journalism & Mass Communications

Faculty Advisor: (Bryan) Ming Wang

Contact Email: mwang10@unl.edu

Potential UCARE Research Position?: Yes

Start Date: Fall 2014

Paid or Volunteer: Volunteer

I lead a Social and Mobile Media Allied Research Team at the College of Journalism & Mass Communications. My team studies the impact of new communication technologies, especially social media and mobile media, in the realm of politics, health and business. We mostly employ social science research methods, such as social media data mining, content analysis, experiments and surveys. Currently, we are working on analyzing social media strategies of Fortune 500 companies and studying the use of social and mobile media during the 2014 midterm elections.

You don’t need to have prior research experiences, but you have to be interested in research. Depending on your background, you can help with coding social media content, reviewing literature, planning and designing research studies, and certainly writing parts of the manuscripts. The student would be a co-author of conference papers and potentially academic publications in mass communication and other social science journals.

Interested students are encouraged to contact Dr. Wang for further details of the project.

Swallowable Microrobotic Capsule for Smart Connected Health

Mechanical and Materials Engineering

Faculty Advisor: Benjamin S. Terry

Contact Email: bterry2@unl.edu

Additional Faculty: Various clinicians from UNMC's Center for Advanced Surgical Technology (CAST)

Potential UCARE Research Position?: Yes

Start Date: September 1, 2014

Paid or Volunteer: Paid

Paid Rate: $10/hour

Hours per week: 10 hours/week

Commercial products resulting from intersection of cyber physical systems and smart, connected, health care systems include wearable sensing technologies that focus on ex vivo systems targeting the elderly, chronically ill, and those who participate in high-risk occupations or recreation, such as military personnel, police, first-responders, and outdoor enthusiasts. Ambulatory in vivo sensing is emerging, with similar applications. Recent developments in biometric-consuming expert systems enhance a physician’s diagnosis and decision-making ability. The next frontier in healthcare will couple ambulatory biometric sensing technology with cloud-connected expert systems to autonomously monitor, diagnose, and treat patients.

The state-of-the-art in commercial and research biometric systems, however, suffers from several shortcomings. For example, wearable sensing systems impose constraints on the subject’s physical activity because the sensor is exposed to external physical contact and an unpredictable ex vivo environment. In addition, in the case of therapeutics, wearable sensing systems are ever-present reminders of a disability (such as an external blood glucose monitor). Most wearable systems rely on intimate skin contact or invasive subcutaneous implants and long-term interfaces between the sensing surface and the tissue are physically uncomfortable to the host and unreliable. In summary, two key obstacles constrain the application space and prevent the adoption of personal biosensors and actuators by the general public: a) lack of sensor transparency; and b) non-intuitive and invasive implementation.

The near-term research objectives of this project are to: 1) Refine the development of a novel swallowable micro-robotic capsule (MRC) that transports and deploys a sensor to the lining of the GI; and 2) Develop a biocompatible temperature sensor and radio frequency transmitter payload to be deployed to the lining of the GI small intestine by the MRC. Successful completion of these objectives will enable for the first time non-invasive, long-term, ambulatory, in vivo, physiological measurements. A participant in this project will assist in the design, fabrication, integration and testing of these miniature robots.

Note: base pay is $10/hour. Up to $12/hour is possible with Work Study.

Implementation of a Telepresence System for a Surgical Robot

Computer Science & Engineering, Mechanical & Materials Engineering

Faculty Advisor: Benjamin S. Terry

Contact Email: bterry2@unl.edu

Additional Faculty: Various clinicians from UNMC's Center for Advanced Surgical Technology (CAST)

Potential UCARE Research Position?: No

Start Date: April 1, 2014

Paid or Volunteer: Paid

Paid Rate: $11/hour

Hours per week: 12 to 20 hours per week starting April 1, 2014; 30-40 hours per week (full time) starting June 1, 2014

This project will focus on the design and implementation of a telepresence system for a surgical robot. The system will enable:

In vivo telepresence, which includes collaboration regarding control of the surgical robot to perform the various surgical tasks, such as identification and manipulation of tissues and organs, surgical procedures, etc.

Ex vivo telepresence, which includes collaboration regarding the establishment of the location and orientation of the surgical ports, setup of the surgical robot, and other ex vivo (bedside) interactions between the surgeon, the OR staff, and the patient that occur during the surgery.

Minimum requirements: 1) Must have taken (or currently enrolled in) CSCE 310
                                      2) Minimum GPA of 3.4

This job is part time during the academic year (12-20 hours per week) and full time over the summer (30-40 hours per week).

Potential Impacts of Wind Energy Development on Soil Invertebrates

Nebraska Cooperative Fish & Wildlife Research Unit, School of Natural Resources

Faculty Advisor: Craig Allen

Additional Faculty: Caroline Jezierski

Contact Email: callen3@unl.edu

Potential UCARE Research Position?: Yes

Start Date: August 25, 2014

Paid or Volunteer: Paid

Hours per week: 10 hours/week

The potential impacts of wind energy generation on wildlife and their habitats are not fully understood and vary greatly depending on the location of the wind facility. Wind energy development and operation can have direct and indirect impacts on wildlife. Direct impacts include deaths resulting from collisions and habitat loss from construction of roads, wind turbine pads, and other structures. Indirect impacts can include wildlife being displaced from preferred habitat through fragmentation or avoidance of the wind turbines, temporarily disturbed from an area, or forced to alter migration and/or movement patterns.

Studies to evaluate the potential impacts of wind energy development on wildlife have been conducted for several years. Yet, there is still much more for researchers to learn. To date, most wind–wildlife studies have focused on the direct impacts to volant or flying animals such as birds and bats. More recent studies are looking at the indirect impacts on birds and large mammals. Very little research has gone into the potential impacts of wind energy development on soil invertebrates and insects.

Soil invertebrates, such as the endangered American burying beetle, may be negatively impacted by wind energy development and operation. Through this UCARE project, we intend to investigate how and if soil invertebrates may be impacted by wind energy development through literature searches, and lab and field studies.

Home Based Care Transitions

Nursing

Faculty Advisor: Lani Zimmerman

Additional Faculty: Myra Schmaderer

Contact Email: lzimmerm@unmc.edu

Potential UCARE Research Position?: Yes

Start Date: Fall 2014

Paid or Volunteer: Paid

Hours per week: 10 hours/week

Patients with multiple chronic illnesses discharged from the hospital are frequently re-hospitalized within 1-3 months. Re-hospitalization puts a huge burden on the patients as well as the hospital.

This project will study patients with chronic illnesses and their care transition from hospital to home. This study will primarily focus on self-management skills for patients categorized by cognition and patient activation level. Students chosen will be actively involved in the research process to improve patient outcomes in this population. Duties may include literature synthesis, data collection, data entry, and attending team meetings. The research may lead to manuscript publication as co-author.

We are particularly interested in students considering an advanced degree in nursing. We are interested in individual or a team of students.

HEART Camp Qualitative Data Project

College of Nursing-Lincoln

Faculty Advisor: Katthleen Duncan, PhD

Contact Email: kduncan@unmc.edu

Potential UCARE Research Position?: Yes

Start Date: Fall 2014

Paid or Volunteer: Paid

Paid rate: $10/hour or UCARE funded

Hours per week: 10 hours/week

The HEART Camp study is a research project investigating the effectiveness of various intervention techniques on exercise adherence over an 18-month period with a population of heart failure patients. This grant is beginning its third of five years and is funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

During the coming year, the student will learn about qualitative research methods for patients with heart failure learning to adhere to an exercise protocol. If selected for this position, your responsibilities may include the following: Complete the IRB training program, conduct keyword searches using databases to search for current literature in nursing, health, and medical fields, review research methods texts to gain clarity and understanding of basic research methods and qualitative philosophies, administer quantitative survey instruments to participants, take notes during qualitative interviews and focus groups, participate in data management activities such as updating the codebook and drafting memos, analyze qualitative and quantitative forms of data, write summaries and reports, and present findings to research team members and other research audiences.

Violence in Late Ottoman Empire

History

Faculty Advisor: Bedross Der Matossian

Additional Faculty: Myra Schmaderer

Contact Email: bdermatossian2@unl.edu

Potential UCARE Research Position?: Yes

Start Date: August 20

Paid or Volunteer: Paid

Paid Rate: $8/hour

Hours per week: 10 hours/week

The student will be involved in a research project that examines inter-ethnic violence in the Ottoman Empire in the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th. The project involves digitization and analysis of primary documents in different languages and by different authors. This includes but not limited to Missionary letters, letters written by Church leaders and other individuals. The project will provide the student with a first-hand experience with research based on primary sources and introduce the student to the techniques of reconstructing history.

Promoting Adherence to Exercise in Patients with Heart Failure

College of Nursing-Lincoln

Faculty Advisor: Katthleen Duncan, PhD

Contact Email: kduncan@unmc.edu

Additional Faculty: Rita McGuire, PhD

Potential UCARE Research Position?: Yes

Start Date: Fall 2014

Paid or Volunteer: Paid

Hours per week: 10 hours/week

The purpose of this research project will be to assist in the delivery of an intervention, HEART Camp and to assess the impact of selected intervention components on exercise adherence in patients with heart failure. Over 5 million people in the US have heart failure and the incidence is continuing to increase (Heart Failure Society of America (2010). Exercise is a recommended treatment but exercise is difficult for patients with heart failure. Despite recognition of the efficacy of exercise in HF, there is little research on ways to support exercise participation in this population.

The proposed project is part of a NIH funded, randomized clinical trial to test an innovative intervention (HEART Camp) designed to improve exercise adherence in patients with heart failure.

Methods. Patients in both groups (invention and control) complete weekly exercise diaries that record their exercise participation. The diaries include type of exercise completed, duration, and intensity. Patients also respond narratively to questions on the benefits and barriers of exercising in the past week. Physical activity is measured with accelerators and by heart rate monitors worn during exercise. The UCARE student will assist in collecting data from these measures, will enter this data and analyze both objective and subjective types of exercise data.

Student Position. The student selected will be a contributing member of our research team and will participate in each part of the research project, including review of the literature, data collection and analysis and presentation of findings. The student is expected to attend team meetings and to have familiarity with instruments that measure physical activity.

E-Trails Smartphone Application Development

Computer Science

Faculty Advisor: Bret Betnar

Contact Email: bbetnar2@unl.edu

Potential UCARE Research Position?: Yes

Start Date: September 2014

Paid or Volunteer: Paid

Hours per week: 10 hours/week

Student researcher will work alongside a Landscape Architecture professor and National Park Service staff to develop a smartphone application (app) for use in outdoor recreation. The app will test the viability of electronic trails (E-trails) as a recreation management tool for public lands.

As these trails are not associated with physical trails, the E-trails will guide trail users through a series of GPS data points. The route will be viewable in either topographical map format or through an augmented reality image. The student researcher will need to be capable (with some level of training) of developing a proof of concept level application for beta-testing at Scotts Bluff National Monument in western Nebraska.

Development of Web-based Interactive Curriculum for Healthy Eating in Child Care

Child, Youth and Family Studies

Faculty Advisor: Dipti Dev

Contact Email: ddev2@unl.edu

Additional Faculty: Lisa-Franzen Castle, Tonia Durden

Potential UCARE Research Position?: Yes

Start Date: Flexible

Paid or Volunteer: Paid

Paid Rate: $8/hour

Hours per week: Up to 10 hours/week

The Healthy Eating in Child Care project involves development of a web-based interactive curriculum with video clips and supporting materials for educating child care teachers about healthful eating strategies for preschool children (2-5y). During this research project, the student will receive training and hands-on experience for conducting literature review, using citation management software, qualitative data analysis, writing video scrips, and evaluating the developed materials using formative assessment.

Skills required: Passion for encouraging healthy eating in children to prevent childhood obesity, interest in working with teachers and children and using technology.

Sustainable Transportation Infrastructure and Materials

Civil Engineering

Faculty Advisor: Yong-Rak KIm

Contact Email: ykim3@unl.edu

Potential UCARE Research Position?: Yes

Start Date: Flexible

Paid or Volunteer: Paid

Hours per week: 10-20 hours/week

Transportation infrastructure systems such as roadways, railroads, airports, and bridges are key public assets of any country in the world, and it is a great interest to develop relevant technologies for safer, more sustainable, energy-efficient, and environment-friendly performance of the infrastructure systems. Over the last several decades there has been a significant shift from the use of empirical approaches towards the use of mechanistic models and materials science to characterize and predict the behavior of infrastructure systems. These strongly depend on the involvement of multidisciplinary engineering knowledge and integrate it with experimental efforts, new theories, and advanced computational modeling methods. More particularly, there is a critical need to challenge the complex multiphysical (thermo-, mechanical-, hygro-, and chemical) and multiscale (material-mixture-structure) behavior of various multiphase (heterogeneous) infrastructure materials and structural systems for their optimized design and sustainable performance.

To that end, my research program seeks state-of-the-art excellence and technologies for the more sustainable transportation infrastructure and materials by integrating experimental, analytical, and computational approaches based on multiscale and multiphysics understanding. Student researchers who join my lab will assist graduate students for specific topics related to materials, infrastructures, and their linking to characterize properties and to model damage-induced behavior and performance.

Biomedical Research in HIV/AIDS

Nebraska Center for Virology & School of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences

Faculty Advisor: Shi-hua Xiang

Contact Email: sxiang2@unl.edu

Start Date: Open

Paid or Volunteer: Volunteer

Hours per week: Flexible, possible 10 hours per week

The laboratory of Dr. Shi-hua Xiang is located at the Ken Morrison Life Sciences Center in the East Campus Center. His research direction is on HIV/AIDS field, and especially focusing on prevention of HIV infection and transmission, such as prophylactic vaccine development, engineering commensal bacteria for anti-HIV infection. His lab is also studying OPPV (ovine progressive pneumonia virus) in sheep and goats, and focusing on virus-host cell interactions. He is looking for a UCARE student to join his dynamic team for conducting these interesting research projects.

Acceptable Undergraduate Majors: Biological Sciences, Biochemistry, Genetics, Biological Systems Engineering, Veterinary or Animal Science.

You can check the website: www.unl.edu/virologycenter/, for more information regarding research projects. If interested, please contact Dr. Xiang via Email or phone (402) 472-4520.

Human Papillomavirus Replication

School of Biological Sciences / Nebraska Center for Virology

Faculty Advisor: Dr. Peter Angeletti

Contact Email: pangeletti2@unl.edu

Start Date: September 1, 2014

Paid or Volunteer: Volunteer

Hours per week: 10 hours/week

The Angeletti lab works on human papillomaviruses (HPVs), which are known to cause cervical cancer. Our interest is in understanding how these viruses stably replicate in host cells. We use various simple and safe means to analyze viral replication functions, often making use of yeast and bacterial culture systems. We are interested in hosting one student to help in the lab during the Fall or Spring semesters and perhaps longer.

The student will work closely with other students in the lab and will learn how to amplify and clone genes, how to manipulate yeast and bacteria, and will gain a basic knowledge of HPVs. This is an ideal project for a student who is interested in lab science. The student is expected to keep a consistent weekly schedule.

Other Research Opportunities

Become an Amgen Scholar! The UCSD Amgen Scholars program is a 10-week, full-time research experience for Undergraduates, supported by the Amgen Foundation. For more information about the program and application process, visit UCSD Amgen Scholars.

Explore summer research opportunities at the U of A. The Undergraduate Research Opportunities Consortium (UROC) provides participants with research training and graduate school preparation through an intensive 10-week research experience. Applications are now available at UROC.

Find information on CIC universities, links to university graduate admissions web sites, and links to CIC programs, all in one place: Gateway to Graduate Education.

Apply to be a Boren Scholar! Live in a critical country to study its language and culture for up to one academic year. Learn more about the scholarship and the application procedures. For the on-campus deadline and to learn more about applying for the Boren, vist borenawards.org/institutions/nebraska/.

Summer Research Opportunities

The University of Nebraska-Lincoln offers a variety of opportunities for undergraduate researchers during the summer. There are three main categories of summer research:

  1. Opportunities exclusively available to UNL students
  2. Opportunities for UNL students and undergraduate researchers from affiliated universities
  3. Opportunities for undergraduate researchers from other universities to perform research with UNL faculty on UNL’s campus

Many universities offer summer research programs on their campuses. Explore the opportunities listed here or look for summer research programs you may be interested in at other institutions.

UCARE Research Opportunities

The Undergraduate Creative Activities and Research Experiences Program, funded by the Pepsi Endowment, supports opportunities for undergraduate researchers to work alongside faculty members and directly participate in the campus's research or creative activities. Undergraduate researchers may apply for UCARE awards to incorporate a research or creative experience into their undergraduate education. Students interested in researching with UNL faculty during the summer only or during the summer and the academic year are encouraged to apply.

CIC SROP Research Opportunities

The Summer Research Opportunities Program (SROP) is a CIC-sponsored research program designed to engage talented undergraduate students from underrepresented groups and prepare them for graduate study through intensive research experiences with faculty mentors and academic enrichment activities. UNL undergraduates can apply through the CIC’s shared application or through individual university applications (if applicable). More details on SROP, including application instructions, are available on the CIC SROP website.

The Nebraska Summer Research Program (SRP)

For students from other universities who want to spend a summer conducting research at UNL, the Nebraska Summer Research Program offers a preview of graduate school life. This intensive research experience provides mentoring and research experiences.

Students with a strong interest in graduate programs and students from populations traditionally underrepresented in graduate education are encouraged to apply. Participants apply to a specific program and work within a cohort for the duration of the program.